Here is a selection of poetry about the Gods – in a variety of moods.

First, Jupiter, King of the Gods, in the mood for love as

Europa’s bull.

After Aeneas and Dido begin their doomed affair, the news is spread by the God of

Rumour.

Aeneas has to be reminded of his divine mission to found a city in Italy by the Gods’ messenger,

Mercury.

All ends badly for Dido. Taking pity, Juno ordains her final release from her agony by

Iris, the rainbow-messenger

Some deities are more glamorous than others. Aeneas meets the ferryman of Hades,

Charon.

Horace has a mystical experience with a vision of

Bacchus.

Arachne discovers that challenging a God is unwise in the course of her weaving contest with

Minerva.

See the index to Latin selection pages here.

This is the first of a new series of Pantheon Poets Latin medleys – a selection of Latin poems which share a common theme. The first is love, and specifically love that is happy – so far. You can hear the Latin and follow in English by following the links, and on each poem page you will find another link if you would like to see a blog post with an illustration.

We start – where else – with one of the most celebrated love poems in any language: Catullus inviting Lesbia to live and love, and not to mind the gossip or count the kisses.
Vivamus, mea Lesbia

Next, Virgil in the Aeneid describes Dido, the Queen of Carthage, falling for Aeneas, the brave and noble Trojan Prince who is her guest.
Dido falls in love

In this extract, Ovid expresses some of the free and easy attitudes to love that we believe got him into trouble with the Emperor Augustus – a great believer in conservative family values – and earned him a one-way ticket to an unhappy exile by the Black Sea.
Ovid’s broad-minded advice to his mistress

Propertius has been out for a night on the tiles and makes a dawn visit to his lady-love, Cynthia.
Propertius and his sleeping beauty

Ovid has been courting. Finally he has had his wicked way, and seems not to care who knows about it.
Ovid’s triumph

Back finally to Catullus, doyen of love poets. How many kisses are enough for him and too much. How many??!!
How many kisses

Links to new selections will be posted in the index here.